Editor's Handbook (Second Edition, 1982)

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Frontmatter 

Here, reproduced without changes, are the original publisher's foreword, the original acknowledgments page, and the original editor's introduction to the 1982 edition.  Together they tell a story about the attitudes and expectations of the times and set a context for the rest of the book.
[Posted 1/20/2002]
  


Part I: The Basics

 1.  What You Absolutely Need to Know 

Chapter 1 deals with the true essentials:  the purpose of the newsletter, the rules you must follow in producing it, the newsletter's place in the organization, and a fundamental understanding of the function of the editor. 
[Posted 1/20/2002]
  
 2.  Getting Started  (1.4 MB)  

Chapter 2 brings you the basics that are just beyond the absolute absolutes:  solid, practical where-to-start recommendations, a grounding in what the newsletter is all about and what you as editor are supposed to do and be, and a plan for making a plan:  building your editing and production schedule to achieve timely delivery to members.  It defines and illustrates three elements--name plate, masthead, and publications statement--that no newsletter should be without, and it tells you where to go for help with any part of your process.
[Posted 1/23/2002]
  


Part II:  The Publication 

 3.  Content 

The focus of Chapter 3 is the substance of the newsletter:  what goes in and why, how to get it, how to work with it, how to work with writers, how to handle difficult submissions and deal with hot issues such as obscenity and censorship, what pitfalls to avoid, and how to stay within the law in matters of copyright and libel. 
[Posted 1/16/2002]
  
 4.  Production  

In 1982, production meant hard-copy paste-up.  All the information about creating mechanicals, from choice of glue to calculating reductions, is obsolete with respect to desktop publishing.  But something useful may be gleaned from sections on layout and design.  Selected portions of this chapter are reproduced here; omissions could be viewed as a road map for needed updates.
[Posted 1/31/2002]
  
 5.  Distribution

Most of the content of this chapter is currently unverified and has been omitted. The original chapter outline is presented, with some sections still in place.
[Posted 1/27/2002]
  
 6.  Finances

Much of the content of this chapter is currently unverified and has been omitted. The original chapter outline is presented, with some sections still in place.
[Posted 1/27/2002]
  
 7.  Record-Keeping and Reporting

All of the content of this chapter is currently unverified and has been omitted. The original chapter plan is presented.
[Posted 1/27/2002]
  
 8.  Especially for SIGs

Chapter 8 contains an annotated list of the other eleven chapters, guiding the attention of SIG editors to the portions most relevant to them.  A SIG editor's dos and don'ts list is included.
[Posted 1/31/2002]
  


Part III:  The Editor 

 9.  Your Editorial Role 

Chapter 9 discusses editorial philosophy and policy (not the same thing), high- and low-profile editors, a view of the editor's job in relation to the local secretary, the members, and the national office, the handling of political material, and a number of other topics that pertain to the editor as a person conscientiously fulfilling a commitment of service to the organization. 
[Posted 1/19/2002]
  
10.  Mensa and You 

Chapter 10 has not been revised or updated in any way; it has only been reformatted.  This chapter provides a surprisingly complete portrait of American Mensa as it was two decades ago:  its relatively flat structure, its officers' and staff's roles and responsibilities and their relationship to the editors, the place of the newsletters in the scheme of things, the editors' relative autonomy, and the experience of fellowship with other editors.  Read this chapter for a striking contrast with the Mensa of today. 
[Posted 1/21/2002]
 
11.  The Voice of Experience

Chapter 11 compiles some editors' responses to questions about the hardest part of the editor's job, problems seen in other newsletters, and desired improvements in their own.  Several editors deliver summations of their perspectives on M publications.
[Posted 1/25/2002]
 
12.  The Reference Shelf

Editors recommend their favorite and most reliable reference works:  style guides, dictionaries, and more.  Several are available in more recent editions than those cited in this twenty-year-old resource. 
[Posted 1/27/2002]
  


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